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Sacagawea is known to be an important part of Lewis and Clark expedition, which is well known in the American public imagination.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association of the early twentieth century adopted her as a symbol of women's worth and independence, erecting several statues and plaques in her memory, and doing much to spread the story of her accomplishments.

They interviewed several trappers who might be able to interpret or guide the expedition up the Missouri River in the springtime.

They agreed to hire Charbonneau as an interpreter because they discovered his wife spoke Shoshone, and they knew they would need the help of Shoshone tribes at the headwaters of the Missouri.

Clark recorded in his journal a french man by Name Chabonah, who Speaks the Big Belley language visit us, he wished to hire & informed us his 2 Squars (squaws) were Snake Indians, we engau (engaged) him to go on with us and take one of his wives to interpret the Snake language ...

Lewis recorded the birth of Jean Baptiste Charbonneau on February 11, 1805, noting that another of the party's interpreters administered crushed rattlesnake rattles to speed the delivery.

See also In art, entertainment, and media as well as Memorials Reliable historical information about Sacagawea is very limited.

She was born into an Agaidika (Salmon Eater) of Lemhi Shoshone tribe between Kenney Creek and Agency Creek near Salmon, Idaho in Lemhi County.The Shoshone agreed to barter horses to the group, and to provide guides to lead them over the cold and barren Rocky Mountains.The trip was so hard that they were reduced to eating tallow candles to survive.At approximately age 13, Sacagawea was sold into a non-consensual "marriage" to Toussaint Charbonneau, a Quebecois trapper living in the village.He also had also bought an enslaved Otter Woman, another young Shoshone, as his "wife." Charbonneau was reported to have purchased both girls to be his "wives" from the Hidatsa, or to have won Sacagawea while gambling.Clark's journal entry for November 20, 1805 reads: one of the Indians had on a roab made of 2 Sea Otter Skins the fur of them were more butifull than any fur I had ever Seen both Capt.