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Then we'd say, "For security purposes we've removed your account information.Please re-enter it." Credit Cards.com: Where did you get the e-mail addresses for your phishing schemes?Today, he's a Web developer at a graphic design company in Rochester, N. He agreed to take an hour with Credit to share his story and his top tips on how to protect yourself. Dan De Felippi: When I was in middle school and high school, I was into what I would call innocent hacking. I was pretty active in online chat rooms where people would talk about this stuff, and I began to realize there was a whole world of credit card fraud where I could make a lot of money with very little effort. Credit Cards.com: You said you bought credit card data online. De Felippi: Every credit card has magnetic stripe on the back with data on it.

"I would make fake IDs to go with them, and then I'd buy laptops or other expensive items in the store and sell them on e Bay," he says.De Felippi was also involved in several other kinds of scams, including phishing schemes that exploited AOL and Pay Pal customers.If you're only checking your statement once a month, someone can start using your card at the beginning of the billing cycle, and they can do a lot of damage before you catch it.You're talking thousands of dollars, and it will be a lot harder to catch them and dispute it. It is really easy to create a fake online store or to create a store that sells stuff, but its real purpose is to collect credit card information.As part of the scam, I'd get their date of birth, address, Social Security number and driver's license number.

Then I could make a fake ID that had all accurate information on it.Credit Cards.com: Do identity thieves like some credit cards better than others?De Felippi: Well, a lot of American Express cards have no set limit, so you'd be able to buy a lot more.That information usually isn't in the magnetic stripe information. With debit cards, it's your real money in your bank account you're playing with.So if a card is skimmed, if someone has its magnetic stripe information, they would still need the number on the front or your ZIP code to commit fraud. So if someone gets your debit card information and uses it, your cash is gone until you fill out a lot of paperwork and persuade the bank to give it back to you.I use Mint.com, which is a free aggregation service that allows you to put all your accounts on there and monitor everything at once. It's also a good idea to check your credit report at least twice a year to make sure no one has stolen your identity. I'd try to stick to reputable sites or at least to sites that have reviews.