Updating bootrom

But when trying to update the firmware for a few phones there is a new process which was introduced with the 4.0 release of UCS.

This process allows the device to be manually pointed to a Polycom hosted web server distribution point on the Internet to download and install new firmware packages from.

For example the recent 4.1 release is only providing Lync-specific features so devices currently used with other SIP platforms (.e.g Broadsoft, Avaya, Nortel, etc) should not install this update and should remain on 4.0 software for now.For this reason it may be necessary to download the available software package for the 4.1 release and then create a custom distribution server to point the devices to.At time of this writing, Grandstream GXP-2000's are around 5, and Polycom 501's are around 0.The Polycom 501's do have more and easier-to-get-to functionality than the GXP-2000's, and have a more professional look and feel (and a great speakerphone), but the most notable downsides of the 501 are its awful, obtuse and slow configuration interfaces.The GXP-2000's are much more resilient and much faster to boot.

Finally, I've also noticed that, for some strange reason, the GMT offset for your time zone will not behave properly sometimes.

As of firmware 1.0.1.9, the Grandstreams are a decent phone, easy and quick to configure, but they have a horrible echo in the speakerphone for the remote party.

A firmware fix for this was promised in October 2005, but I decided to not wait and get some Polycom 501 phones as well, as Polycom phones are legendary for being excellent speakerphones, and the 501 model was their lowest priced speakerphone model.

Fortunately, there seems to be an easy fix for it (see below).

I experienced this problem while I was making this documentation.

Some other points which might be important to you are that the GXP-2000 boots up much faster than the 501 (50 seconds for the GXP-2000, three minutes for the 501) and the 501 is very sensitive to power failures during bootup.